News

Syrian children

Hamilton Spectator. 
November 29, 2016

"My five-year-old son is correcting me," said Emad Al Hariri, smiling broadly, proudly, as though it were the best thing in the world, and it is.

Emad's English is admirable (he's almost finished his ESL levels), his son's even better. Young brains inhale language, are enriched by it, like oxygen. Mohammed is in kindergarten at Earl Kitchener and adapting – Emad is searching for the word; he has the meaning – as fast as Canadian life can throw down stuff for the youngster to adapt to.

Emad, his sons, Mohammad and Yousself, and his wife, Kothar, were among dozens of mostly Syrian refugees and yet as many representatives of sponsor groups, municipal government, settlement and other help organizations, gathered at City Hall for a great celebration. It was to thank the community for its welcome and inclusiveness, including the refugees themselves, who are already enriching the city.

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Diversity at Coppley

Hamilton Spectator. 
November 21, 2016

There is a large world map at Coppley's office in the heart of Hamilton. More than a hundred tiny pins dot the map, seemingly placed at random. However, a closer look shows how each pin is in fact marking a different country. Stretching all the way from Asia to the Middle East, Africa, Europe, and North America, these pins mark the countries of origin of Coppley's staff. It is a powerful visualization of how skills and talents from all over the world work together at Coppley.

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Hamilton Health Sciences

Hamilton Spectator. 
October 11, 2016

When Keivan Saeedi, a nurse from Iran, moved to Canada in 2012, he needed to register to continue practising nursing. Saeedi tried to navigate the process, but found it frustrating. Then he met Daniela Beckford, a project manager and internationally educated nurse at Hamilton Health Sciences.

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Rockwell Automation

Hamilton Spectator. 
September 26, 2016

When Paul Klager signed up as a mentor for internationally trained professionals, he wanted to help others, especially newcomers, find work in their area of specialization. But the experience was eye-opening for him, too.

"Before this experience, I personally took for granted many of the cultural challenges that some of my customers and internationally trained colleagues experience on a daily basis," said Klager, account manager at Rockwell Automation, which manufactures automation equipment.

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College Boreal

Hamilton Spectator. 
August 28, 2016

When Charles Butera meets newcomer clients at Collège Boréal's Employment Options, which helps job seekers find sustainable employment and employers find suitable employees, there is often an instant connection. Butera moved to Canada from Rwanda and he can relate to the clients' experiences. Drawing from his own journey of settlement, he helps others better understand the road to success in Canada. In turn, clients trust Butera and find inspiration.

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RBC

Hamilton Spectator. 
June 22, 2016

Moving to a new city can be exciting, but when Manish Trehan moved to Hamilton last year to join the Royal Bank of Canada (RBC) as an assistant branch manager, he suddenly found himself alone. Leaving behind his personal and professional networks, Trehan was keen for opportunities to form new connections in Hamilton. Then he heard about the MOSAIC Employee Resource Group at RBC.

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Hamilton Spectator. By Judy Travis.
February 10, 2016

Every morning when I walk through Jackson Square to my office in the Hamilton City Centre, I am mesmerized by the faces I meet and the diversity in Hamilton. One in four Hamiltonians was born outside of Canada. Even the small food court at the mall reflects this, featuring cuisines from Japan to Greece to Lebanon and West Africa. People from all over the world make up our communities, contribute to our country with their global skills and experiences, and enrich our culture.

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